Indonesian Language: The easiest lanugage in the world to learn.

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Indonesian Language: The newest, most widely spoken,
most dynamic language in the world.


For anyone who wants to travel to an exotic location and be able to talk with the locals in their own language, Indonesia is an ideal place. The country itself has a huge array of cultural and natural diversity. Although each region has its own local language, which is distinct and not just a dialect, vertually everyone now speaks Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian Language). It was only declared as the official language of Indonesia in 1945 when Indonesia declared independence. In order to unify such a diverse nation, a common language was clearly needed. Rather than impose the most commonly spoken language, Javanese, which is very difficult and only spoken on Java, the new Indonesian government wisely chose a little known dialect based on a version of Malay from the Riau islands in western Indonesia, now called Riau Indonesian. The concept of one Indonesian language began as early as 1928, following the 1928 unifying-language declaration in the Indonesian Youth Pledge.

From Wikipedia: Almost 100% of Indonesia's 240 million inhabitants speak the language and it is one of most widely spoken languages in the world.[1] Most Indonesians, aside from speaking the national language, are fluent in another regional language or local dialect (examples include Minangkabau, Sundanese, Javanese and Balinese) that are commonly used at home and within the local community. Most formal education, as well as nearly all national media and other forms of communication, are conducted in Indonesian.

The Indonesian name for the language is Bahasa Indonesia (lit. "the language of Indonesia"). This term can sometimes still be found in written or spoken English. In addition, the language is sometimes referred to as "Bahasa" by English speakers, though this simply means "language" and thus is also not an official term for the Indonesian language.

To continue reading it Indonesian Language Wikipedia.

Actually, Indonesian is a language that has been used as a lingua franca in the Indonesian archipelago for centuries, so it was a natural choice to become the official language upon Indonesian's declaration of independence in 1945.

Being a 'young' language, Indonesian has 'grown' rapidly since its 'birth' in 1945. Proper or formal Indonesian is taught in schools and spoken in formal situations, but the standard, correct version of the Indonesian language is rarely used in daily communication. There are virtually no native Indonesian speakers who use completely formally standard language in their daily conversations.

Thus, the obvious question begs to be asked: why study it? Well, it is needed to read newspapers, understand news broadcasts and participate in formal business or government discussions, but for daily communication it is nearly a foreign language. On a daily basis, Indonesians will either speak their local language (Sundanese, Javanese, etc) or they will speak a 'slang' version of Indonesian (most common in Jakarta area). Through television and radio, 'Jakarta slang' is now well known throughout Indonesia.

As a learner of the Indonesian language, it's best to find a balance between formal Indonesian and daily Indonesian, and in fact Indonesians themselves will do the same, depending on the situation and who they are talking to. For example, the use a much more formal version when talking with their boss versus speaking with their colleagues.

Daily Indonesian is much, much easier to learn because it largely ignores the suffixes and prefixes which most learners of the Indonesian language find particularly difficult. By learning daily Indonesian first, then progressing to more formal Indonesian, the speed of your learning will increase dramatically, and the quality of your Indonesian will be much higher.









 
Apa ini? (What's this?)
Apa?
Ini.
Itu buku. (That's a book.)
Buku siapa? [Book who?]
Buku saya. (My book.)
Buku kamu? (Your book?)
Iya, buku saya.

Ini buku kamu juga?
Iya, itu buku saya.
Dan ini?
Iya, itu buku saya juga.

Ini apa?
Apa?
Ini.
Itu majalah.
Majalah siapa?
Majalah saya.
Majalah kamu?
Iya, majalah saya.

Dan ini?
Itu majalah saya juga.

(looking at a photo)
Ini siapa? (Who's this?)
Mana? (Where?)
Ini.
Itu anak saya.
Namanya siapa?
Rayhan.
Umurnya berapa?
(How old is he?)
Delapan. (8)
Tinggal di mana dia?
(Where does he live?)
Sama ibunya.
(With his mom.)

Ini apa?
Koran.

And so on..

Each individual student can progress at whatever speed they're comfortable with.

Another important factor is to trust the method and trust yourself. Just 'let it happen' and you will learn very quickly.


selamat pagi
(good morning)
selamat siang
selamat sore
selamat malam
Here's a list of words to get you going, and remember, don't waste time and effort trying to memorize words. Glance over the list quickly and let your intuitive learning ability take control.

apa
siapa
mana
kenapa
bagaimana
berapa

juga

saya
kamu
dia
mereka

buku
majalah
koran
pulpen
pensil
meja
kursi

suami
istri
anak
kakak
adik
ayah
ibu

bapak
ibu
teman

nama
umur

dari
ke
di

sama

tinggal
kerja
main
baca
mau
makan
minum
tidur

jam
waktu
jam berapa

sekarang
nanti
tadi

hari ini
kemaren
besok

pagi
siang
sore
malam

hai
halo


what
who
where
why
how
how many

also, too

I, me, my
you, your
he/she
they

book
magazine
newspaper
pen
pencil
table
chair

husband
wife
child
older br/sis
younger br/s
dad
mom

mister
ma'am
friend

name
age

from
to
in, at, on

same; with

live, stay
work
play
read
want
eat
drink
sleep

time, hour
time
what time

now
later
earlier

today
yesterday
tomorrow

morning
mid-day
afternoon
night

hi
hello